Academic Programs

Peace Studies

P 126 AND P 126-W VARIETIES OF CHRISTIAN PEACE WITNESS

This course introduces students to varieties of theologies and ways of practicing peace in the Christian tradition, with a concentration on the historic peace churches: Brethren, Mennonites and Friends. The course employs a variety of disciplinary approaches. In addition, the course will take up at least one Christian peace theology not from an historical peace church and will discuss elements of Christian arguments to justify war. This course may be taken in a traditional classroom format (P 126) or as a combination of weekend seminars and online learning (P 126-W).
3 semester hours.

P 201-S CONFLICT RESOLUTION

This course provides the student with an introduction to the study of conflict and its resolution. We will explore the basic theoretical concepts of the field and apply this knowledge as we learn and practice skills for analyzing and resolving conflicts. The course seeks to answer the following questions at both the theoretical level and the level of personal action: What are the causes and consequences of social conflict? How do we come to know and understand conflict? How do our assumptions about conflict affect our strategies for management or resolution? What methods are available for waging and resolving conflicts productively rather than destructively? This course is offered at the Susquehanna Valley Ministry Center.
3 semester hours.

P 204 and P 204-T GOSPEL OF PEACE

This seminar offers a survey of biblical texts related to peace and violence. We will interpret these texts collaboratively, paying attention to their historical and literary contexts and to their meanings for readers today. We will also explore the implications of this biblical background for our understandings and practices of peacemaking.
3 semester hours.

P 227 GLOBALIZATION

This course examines dynamics of globalization, its impact on human communities and the earth, and its challenges to Christian faith and ethics. We will explore various Christian responses to globalization, including the work of the World Council of Churches. The course will focus on the impacts of globalization in the U.S. and abroad—growing inequality, social dislocation, environmental destruction—and include resources and strategies for how individuals and congregations can respond.
3 semester hours.

P 228 RELIGION AS A SOURCE OF TERROR & TRANSFORMATION

Since September 11, 2001, there has been a renewed awareness of how religion and religious discourse can become a source of both terror and transformation. This relationship between terror and transformation is especially challenging and complicated when religion "goes public." How do particular and prophetic religions enter pluralistic, public squares and contribute to social and political understanding and policy? Can there be credible expressions of public theology in our late modern, postmodern age? This course will explore the problems and possibilities of religious language and practice with the hope of what the prophet Jeremiah called "the peace of the city" in view.
3 semester hours.

P 268 1968: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC THEOLOGY

In 1968, as many barricades went up around the world, more religious, cultural, and political borders and boundaries were freely transgressed. This course will use the music, movies, art, literature, and political discourses of 1968 as a window into the cultural transformations of the religious thought and practice of the era. Particular attention will be given to the complicated challenges of public God-talk in a multicultural world of plurality, ambiguity, and fiercely contested truth claims.
3 semester hours.

P 249 THE PEACE OF THE CITY AND THE QUEST FOR A PUBLIC THEOLOGY

This course will work with the thesis that the biblical story of redemption begins in a garden (Eden) but ends in a city (the New Jerusalem). Religion may indeed begin in solitude, but as social creatures, our lives are public. Biblical religion reminds us that our faith is embodied in evangelical, ethical and aesthetic engagements with culture, thus inviting public theological reflection. Combining the disciplines of peace studies and theology, the course will explore how a variety of public proposals for theology might contribute to or inhibit what prophetic religion has called the shalom or welfare of the city.
3 semester hours.

P 380 AND P 380-S BONHOEFFER, WAR, AND PEACE

This course blends the disciplines of peace studies, theology, and ethics to bring the life and thought of martyred pastor and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer into conversation with the genuine dilemmas of Christian conscience around the problems of war and peace in a time of totalitarian politics and the horrors of the Holocaust. Particular attention will be given to Bonhoeffer's New York experience and how it helped form and inform his final resistance to European fascism. This course is offered at Richmond and at the Susquehanna Valley Ministry Center.
3 semester hours.
Prerequisite P 126, P 126-W, T 101, T 101-O, TS 101, or TS 101-O.

P 290 or 390 SEMINAR IN PEACE STUDIES

Various courses may either be offered as a regular part of the curriculum or developed as a group reading course which fulfill the peace studies curriculum requirements. Recent offerings are The Historic Peace Churches & the Decade to Overcome Violence from Africa to Asia, and Emotional Intelligence & Conflict Transformation.
3 semester hours.
The 390 level will carry a prerequisite of P 126 or P 126-W.